DD5LP/P – June 21st and 22nd 2019 – DM/BW-348 Gehrenberg and DM/BW-854 Hoechsten.

Preparation:

Well it’s Ham Radio Friedrichshafen time again – the largest Ham Fest in IARU Region 1. There are two summits within reasonable driving distance from Friedrichshafen and indeed I picked my hotel (and the location of the annual SOTA Dinner) to be near one of them – Hoechsten.

I had to change my planned activation dates based on some storm warnings. In fact the storms never came but I managed to fit both into my 3 day, two night, stay in the area in any case. I had several antennas with me but the plan was always to use the linked dipole at the wooded Gehrenberg and the VP2E at the more open Hoechsten and indeed that’s what I did.

The Activation (Gehrenberg):

I had intended activating this summit on Saturday evening on the way back from Ham Radio to my hotel but as the weather forecast assured me that it was going to pour down for the whole of Saturday, I decided to fit the activation in on the Friday and then still get back to the hotel in time to check-in, get changed and ready for the SOTA dinner which I had organised.

I have activated this summit for the last three years but one year the Navi (GPS) took me to the wrong place so this time I had a printed map of the area with me as well. There was no need however and I found my way to the edge of the woods fine. Although the track goes up almost to the summit, that road is restricted and intented for use only by the forrestry commission (see photo of sign below). Whetehr anyone ever chexcks, I doubt it, but I wanted to do the “right thing” so I unload and walked up the track to the summit with large tripod, 6 metre mast and linked dipole along with the Xiegu X108G rig, microphone, logbook, etc. etc. – i.e. the normal gear. I checked the spots and saw nothing, so as i was setting off from the car, I spotted myself, saying I would be QRV in 20 minutes.

as it turned out, on arriving at the summit I was met by two other SOTA activators who were just coming to the end of their activation and had seen my spot. It was lucky that they were there as after setting up my gear and when they had finished on HF, I was only able to get two contacts for the summit. Appraently there had been a constant flow of activations all day long meaning that the chasers were no longer intere4sted as they do not get points for a duplicate contact within a day. Thomas DL1DVE, seeing my problem, quickly “rustled up” three simplex contacts on 2 metres from his Handy Talkie (one of them an S2S) meaning, I had the needed contacts. Thanks Tom! Tom and his friend (sorry I forgot the name and call sign), then left the summit and I started to pack up as Luc ON7DQ arrived. This is a busy summit indeed! After greeting Luc, who seemed to find contact easily using CW, I left back to the car.

I then set the Navi (GPS) to take me to the hotel by the shortest route and that route took me first to Hoechsten. I was tempted to stop and make my activation there but decided the time was too short and I’d leave it for the next morning.

Arriving backt the Hotel, the weather was still beautiful and it was to stay that way for the complete weekend, despite whet the forecast had said.

There followed a lovely evening with a total of 33 SOTA-ists at the dinner, most who had or were planning to activate the two summits over the weekend.

At the dinner I met Jaan SM0OEK who had managed to activate Hoechsten on his way from Friedrichshafen with Steve G1INK who had given him a lift from the Ham Radio show. Jann was also staying at the hotel like me, so wwe agreed I would give him a lift in on Saturday.

The Activation (Hoechsten):

Saturday started with an early breakfast and then Jaan and I set off for Hoechsten. As Jaan has activated the summit the previous day, he was not worried about activating again but happy to help me set up the equipment.

This time the arcitects tripod and the 10 metre mast along with the 20m/40m VP2E antenna and all the radio gear was taken out of the car.

Hoechsten is a real “drive-up” SOTA summit with us setting up no more than 500 metres away from the car, which was good as it would turn out.

Jaan assisted with the set-up and the (large) antenna was soon up and ready to go. The weather was still nice and the sun had come up, meaning I was back to my normal issue of not being able to read the OLED screen in the X108G. I didn’t want to have to connect up my phone if I could avid it as this was to be a “hit and run” activation so that we could get to the show ASAP. The problems turned out to be even worse that the bad visibility. The wrong filter and mode had been selected and pressing the buttons made no difference. I had to get the rig somewhere where I could read the display, so I disconnected the antenna and took the rig and battery box back to the car, where thankfully I could sort everything out. The problem is one I have had before – the CMOS battery had gone flat and hence no settings were being remembered. The CMOS battery should be recharged from the rig’s supply but that seems not to work in the later X108G models. I do have a spare (solder tab equipped) CMOS battery but not with me in Friedrichshafen, so this would be the laast operation of the rig until I got it repaired after returning home. So with the rig still running I went back out to the field and antenna where Jaan was waiting and thankfully managed to get six quick contacts on 40m before we packed up and headed into the show. It was during driving back that I realised I had not taken any photos for this report but thankfully Jaan had and he sent me the photos, so those you see below for Hoechsten are courtesey of Jaan SM0OEK. Thanks Jaan.

Photos (Gehrenberg):

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Photos (Hoechsten):

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Equipment used:

Gehrenberg:

  • Xiegu X108G plus battery box (2 x 5000maH hardcase LIPOs)
  • Linked dipole antenna
  • 6 metre Lambda-Halbe fibreglass portable mast.
  • Surveyors tripod.
  • Thick plastic painters sheet.
  • Tom DL1DVE’s HT with RH-770 antenna.

Hoechsten:

  • Xiegu X108G plus battery box (2 x 5000maH hardcase LIPOs).
  • Linked (20/40m) VP2E antenna
  • 10 metre DX-Wire fibreglass portable mast.
  • Surveyors tripod.
  • Thick plastic painters sheet.

Log (Gehrenberg):

Log (Hoechsten):

Conclusions:

Don’t trust that your equipment will continue to work, even if you test it. Previous problems WILL return in the gear – it’s only ever a question of time (OLED display and CMOS battery in the X108G).

Taking a lightweight dual-band HT along would have been good “insurance” in this case where there is known to be a lot of 2m/70cm activity in the area (normally there’s nothing).

73 ’til the next Summit!

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DD5LP/P – June 18th 2019 – DL/AM-176 Rentschen.

Preparation:

The primary aim of this activation was to give John (VK6NU) a summit-to-summit contact while he was on a summit in Ireland (EI/IE-057) as part of his European trip.

I had planned to go to Wank near Garmisch Partenkirchen as I have not activated that summit this year as yet. Looking at the time involved and the somewhat strenuous last section up to the summit with all the gear, I decided to simply go to the closer Rentschen summit, where one can literally drive on to the summit (it is a plateau).

This would also be another chance to use the new VP2E antenna with its traps fitted, to see how it performs.

I only needed to be on the summit by 11:30am, local time, so I had time to prepare all the gear in the morning. This would be the Xiegu X108G and cable to my Smartphone, so that I can read the display, the 10 metre “mini-mast”, the Surveyors tripod and the 40/20m trapped or linked VP2E wire antenna along with the walking sticks to lift the ends of the antenna.

The Activation:

As I approached Rentschen, I saw a farmer cutting the grass and hoped he hadn’t planned to start on the top field where the actual summit with its trig point stone was. Luckily this did not turn out to be the case.

I set up right at the Trig point marker stone and after some taffling and un-taffling of the antenna wires, I had got the antenna up with the 20 metre traps installed in the antenna – this should make it possible to use the antenna on 40m and 20m without having to lower the antenna to link or unlink sections. I had tried these traps previously using the antenna on 20m and all seemed fine. This time I was going to start on 40m.

Listening around the band, despite all the space weather readings that say it shouldn’t be, the band was nicely active with strong signals coming in up and down the 40m band. I even heard and called GB19DDAY on-board the HMS Belfast ship in the Thames in London, but couldn’t get through all the others calling him. That was a shame as some of the ICQPodcast team volunteer on the HMS Belfast some weekends. But it wasn’t to be.

My first contact after spotting myself on SOTAWatch was Lucas ON3YB and although he was a strong 5-9 signal, his report back to me was only 2-2. I suspected the traps and so I asked him to wait until I removed them. I lowered the antenna, unplugged the traps and plugged the links for 40m through and put everything back up. Unfortunately, by this time Lucas had gone, but most of the following contacts got reports between 5-5 and 5-9 which is more what I would expect, so it does seem the traps degrade the antenna considerably. to be sure, however I’ll need to do more tests.

Mixed into my 17 contacts on this activation, I had 8 Summit-to-summit (S2S) contacts, including the planned one with John VK6NU in Ireland and Mike 2E0YYY/P who was out for the same reason and Luc ON7DQ who is on his way down to Friedrichshafen for the HAM RADIO show at the end of the week. I also talked to a few people who I plan to see at FN in a few days.

After an hours operating I got a problem that I switched the receive filter to the 500Hz CW position and while I could not read the display and the filter setting cannot be changed via the CiV remote control commands from my phone on this rig, I decided to pack up and call it a day with a nice list of contacts in the bag.

Photos:

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Equipment:

Xiegu X108G.

Battery box (2 x 5000maH hardcase LIPOs).

VP2E (Vertically polarised, 2 element, 20m wire antenna).

Surveyors tripod.

10 metre DX-Wire fibreglass portable mast.

Thick plastic painters sheet.

Smartphone PocketRxTx App and USB cable.

Log:

Conclusions:

The propagation was better than was expected and reflected in the number of S2S contacts made. Some of them from stations that I would not normally hear because of skip distance. There was deep QSB on the band, so perhaps this was Sporadic-E ? whatever it was, it was a nice activation, making several nice contacts including the one with John VK6NU, which was the purpose of the activation.

The VP2E antenna performed well once the traps were out of the circuit. The SWR this time showed between 1:1 and 1.1:1 so it looks that raising the ends with the walking poles is a good move.

The problem at the very end of the activation, where I pressed a button in error and switched to the CW filter may be able to be fixed by using a special initialisation string in the remote control software that runs on the smartphone. I will take a look at this.

73 ’til the next Summit!

DD5LP/P – May 31st 2019 – DL/AM-001 Peissenberg – hoping for contact into VK with VP2E antenna.

Preparation:

As Jonathan VK7JON was heading out with his wife to a beach in Tasmania to operate portable, Mike 2E0YYY, Bill F/G4WSB and myself decided, despite the early hour that we would head out to some summits to see if we could get a contact via 40 metres long path.

Due to the early start needed to meet the long path window and Jonathan’s planned activation time, I chose Piessenberg even though I had already activated it three times this year.

There was also a chance to make a contact with Thomas operating as FR/F4HPX/P from Reunion Island off the coast of Mozambique on the 10 pointer FR/RE-004 summit about 30 minutes later (this most likely on 20 metres).

As I had updated my two VP2E antennas since getting back from Dayton, I decided it was best to check that they were still correctly resonant on their bands (one is 40/20m and the other 20/17m). This I did on Thursday (the day before the activation) and thankfully all was fine (if you are interested in this antenna, the full design details and my tests are documented on this website under Equipment/Antennas/HB9SL Vp2E antenna).

The Activation:

The 40 minute run down to Peissenberg went without any problems only when I arrived, there was a surprise. The car park was not there any more! It was covered with an enormous marque tent, such as sometimes are used for large wedding receptions. Luckily there was still some parking space off the road at the end (near the woodwork statue) and the area that I wanted to use (on the grass field at the side of the car park) was still clear. So i parked and then carried everything to one of the convenient bench seats.

 After setting the antenna and station up, while tuning around looking 40 metres for a free frequency I came across this strange transmission on the band.

I initially checked if 7090kHz was free, spotted my self and started putting out a CQ. after about 10 minutes of no contacts a CW station started up on the frequency. While this is the QRP channel, it is well outside of the normal CW area of the band. Given the slow speed of the morse, I guessed it was some form of CW teaching class and decided to go and find a different free frequency.

I ended up on 7163 kHz between two other stations as the band was quite busy. I was able to keep this frequency for the whole time I was active however, so that worked out well. Perhaps as it was still silly-early there were not that any callers to start with and I wondered if in fact I was getting out OK? I could certainly hear stations. I took a tune around and found GJ/OQ7A/P on an IOTA DXPedition on “The Minkies” in the Channel Islands. As he was not getting any responses to his CQ calls I gave him a call and we had a short chat proving that we were both getting out and it was the lack of chasers that was the problem. I then went back to my 7163kHz frequency and got a slow run of callers from around Europe, including an S2S call from Bill F/G4WSB/P on FL/VL-001. Mike 2E0YYY/P also called in, he had chosen to go to a closer HEMA summit rather than a SOTA one, so this didn’t count as an S2S contact in SOTA terms but a nice short chat in any case. In the ten stations that I worked there were both a few new calls and a few of the old reliable chasers. It was interesting that with some of the stations they were weaker than usual, while others were stronger. This I put down to the direction I had set up the VP2E antenna as it was “aimed” long path at VK. Unfortunately even though Jonathan VK7JON managed a contact with Mike 2E0YYY in the UK, he never made it the whole way down to me which would have been another 1000 km and another skip off the Ionosphere. I was just thinking it might be time to take a listen for Thomas on Reunion Island as we had come to the end of the best possible part of the long path window to VK by this time and then I heard an engine. It was the local farmer coming across the field cutting the tall grass down. I managed to flag him down before he got to the antenna and told him I’d have it packed up and out of the way in 5 minutes. He was apologetic but explained that the field had to be cut at that time – hey it’s his field I’m in, he didn’t need to be apologetic. In any case it was a nice meeting. He went off and cut another part of the field while I packed up and then came back to take care of that area. He said he wouldn’t be long and it would be fine if I wanted to set-up again in a few minutes. I thanked him but decided not to as it was already almost the time I was going to call it a day in any case.

That’s the first time my activation has been “cut short” as the antenna nearly was! in any case HI!

After packing up, it was a casual drive back home during which time it started to rain, so had I stayed longer, that would also have been with me.

Photos:

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Equipment:

Xiegu X108D 20w HF transciever

Surveyors large tripod

DX-Wire 10m “mini-mast”.

Home made HB9SL VP2E antenna (Linked 40/20m).

Log:

Conclusions:

With the Kp Index still being between 2 & 3 from a CME that hit 48 hours earlier, some deep QSB and static cracks from the approaching storm, reception on 40m was never going to be good. I did hear at least one station calling me that I couldn’t make out in the noise. Another started but came up out of the noise so that I could work him, so with a LOT of luck and Jonathan calling me on my frequency – the contact “might” have been possible but it would have been a minimal contact, nothing like the 5-7 each way contact that he had with Mike 2E0YYY/P. That extra 1000 km and extra bounce off the Ionosphere make a big difference.

I continue to like the capability og putting the mast where I want it, with the surveyors tripod, despite its size and weight. At Peissenberg, I only needed to carry it about 70 metres in any case.

The VP2E does appear to work well and I know have the ends raised off the ground using my walking poles, so that the wire doesn’t drop into the grass.

As it was still early and there was little sun to speak of, I was able to opearte the X108G without having to plug my Smart Phone into it to use as an external larger and brighter screen.

73 ’til the next Summit!

W8/VK2JI/P – May 19th 2019 – W8O/CT-001 Campbell Hill – Activation but no Qualification!

Preparation:

As part of my trip to Hamvention in the US I planned an activation of a summit in the US for my SOTA Mountain Explorer award. That of course comes with some restrictions and the “normal” SOTA kit was going to be too heavy and take up too much space to take on the plane.

Please refer to my last entry – the activation of Peissenberg (here) to test that the seven year old antenna solution still worked. – it did as so it was the solution that I packed.

The activation was going to have to be a quick one as I was with 4 others on this trip, three of whom who weren’t that interested in SOTA. I already new the exact summit was going to be closed as it’s in the private grounds of an educational facility but luckily there. a road alongside the fenced area that is still within the activation zone, so that would be my location.

The Activation:

Despite the fact that the morning was dry, as we got closer to the SOTA summit (the highest point in the state of Ohio) I saw a post on SOTAWatch from another activator on a SOTA summit in Ohio who was packing up as a storm front was coming his way.

Had we got to the summit at the originally planned time we would have been all right however our plans changed and it meant that the (very heavy) storm front hit as we were having lunch in Bellefontaine – where Campbell Hill is located.

we set off anyway in the hope that by the time we arrived at the summit, the rain would have stopped – it didn’t. It got WORSE!

We found a concreted area off the road which was a recycling drop off point and Edmund M0MNG (the other SOTA interested member of the ICQPodcast team) who had sensibly ONLY brought an HT and an extended antenna along, positioned himself under what cover from the rain could be found under the overhang from a small building on the parking area and started calling CQ SOTA on the US 2m FM calling frequency.

I in the mean time, started unpacking my EFHW antenna while trying to see which tree I might get the cord over to get the end of the antenna up in the air. It’s at this point that I remembered how long the 40m EFHW is and that hauling it up in any of the available trees would not allow me to use what little cover the was from the small buildings roof. I decided to wait a while in the car as I was already soaked through. At this point Edmund got his first 2m SOTA contact of the activation working VA3VAD/M – Canada!!! (actually not – it appears the Canadian Hams mobile in the US, simply use their Canadian call without the need for any prefix or suffix! In any case once Edmond had worked the station, I asked if he would let me work the station and of he did. In this way, we had both “activated” if not “qualified”, the summit as I was starting to doubt whether we would achive the required 4 contacts to get the points for the summit.

I waited a further 20 minutes and the rains did not subside – it was a constant downpour and the lightweight jacket I had with me was doing a good job but the jeans were dripping wet. I then asked Edmund whether he wanted to continue as the others were waiting for us still in the coffee shop in the village where we had dropped them off. Then at this point after 40 minutes of no contacts – he got a call and was eager to stay to try to get the 3rd & 4th needed contacts. Number 3 came relatively quickly but number 4 took some time, but it DID come and we were able to head back to the rest of the group. Well done for your perseverance Edmund!

I was disappointed that I didn’t get my station set-up on HF as I’m sure – despite the rain, the contacts would have been there. In hindsight (that great thing Hindsight) I could have attached the telescopic whip and “miracle antenna tuner” to my FT-817 to get on HF without the need for the long wire antenna – it would have been better than nothing, but I simply didn’t think of it! I could have operated on 2m or 70cm as well with the FT917’s “rubber ducky” antenna, but that would most likely have caused interference to Edmund.

  At least, with Edmund’s help, I activated the summit, in that I had a contact from the summit, but having carried all the HF gear with me from Germany, I would have liked to have used it.

An hour earlier and two hours later at the summit there was no rain but that was simply not possible with the travel schedule restrictions that we had.

Photos:

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Equipment:

Wouxon KG-UV6D (Edmund’s)

Home made two metre loaded vertical whip (Edmund’s).

Log:

Conclusions:

Sometimes things just don’t go right! The rest of my trip went very well.

In hindsight;

If we had stuck with the original schedule the activation would have been finished before the storm arrived – possibly even with a HF S2S contact to the other W8O activator that was out.

I could have tried the “Miracle Antenna” on HF when it became clear I wasn’t going to be able to get the end-fed-half-wave antenna out.

It was lucky that Edmund had taken a different approach. without him having his 2m HT with him – unless I had remembered that the FT-817 does 2m as well, I wouldn’t have activated and Edmund, qualified the 4 point summit.

73 ’til the next Summit!

DD5LP/P – May 8th 2019 – DL/AM-001 Peissenberg – testing equipment for US trip.

Preparation:

as I intend visiting Hamvention in the US this month, I have also planned in an activation of a summit in the US for my SOTA Mountain Explorer award. That of course comes with some restrictions and the “normal” SOTA kit is going to be too heavy and take up too much space to take on the plane.

Seven years ago I made up some very lightweight end-fed half wave antennas for a trip from Australia to Europe where I had similar space and weight restraints. At that time however I hadn’t being doing SOTA for very long, so these were some of my first antennas for SOTA.

For the transmitter, I decided it would be easier to take my 5 watt FT-817ND rather than my Xiego X108G 20 watt transmitter, given the current aversion to Chinese products by the US Government (and possible questionable FCC approval). The Yaesu will have all of the US approvals while the Chinese unit may not.

So that will be the configuration; the FT817ND and the EFHW antennas for 40m and 20m matched to the 50 ohm antenna port on the rig using a small “Miracle Antenna” ATU unit.

I checked the antennas at home on the antenna analyser and they seem fine still after so many years of no use but I needed to check the complete configuration out at a site that would be somewhat similar to what I expect at the W8O/CT-001 Campbell Hill summit in Ohio. (Please listen for me and the rest of the ICQPodcast team around 1600 UTC on Sunday May 19th).

I chose Piessenberg for this. Not my usual location at the absolute summit, alongside the church but in the car park a little further down the hill, which is still in the activation zone and with a parking arae and a few trees is similar to what I expect at Campbell Hill.

The Activation:

Despite the fact it was cold and drizzling from time to time, it turned out to be a magic activation! My expectations of the antennas were not great before starting and the activation didn’t start well, with me throwing the throw bag too hard and it wrapping it’s cord around two branches. Luckily I had brought the standard gear with me as backup and I took the 6m fishing pole out and used that to untangle the mess I had made. After that I threw the bag with less force and all was fine.

In a quarter of an hour I had 10 chasers call me on 40m, two of those were S2S calls. These came from pretty well most directions around Europe with (true) reports given from 3-3 to 5-9 – even the 3-3 got revised to 5-5 as the QSB came up and the QRM went down.

Taking the 40m antenna down and putting the 20m one up took about 15 minutes and once on 20m I had problems getting calls, so I tuned around and found the IOTA DXPedition station TM5FI who came back to my first call and we exchanged 5-9 reports – I don’t know if this was a true report, however the station after me only got a 5-6, so I think it might have been. A few more 20m CQs raised reliable Lars SA4BLM in Sweden who gave me a 5-3.

With just five watts and simple antennas only about 3m AGL in the lower tree branches at one end and on the bench seat at the rig end – I’m really surprised (and happy) with the results!

I had just one job to do when I returned home – I had managed to snap the 40m antenna while winding it up. I use printed circuit board patching wire (about 28 swg) for the antennas which make them REALLY compact and light to carry but one downside is that the wire breaks easily.

Photos:

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Equipment:

Yaesu FT817ND

Home made end-fed halfwave antennas for 20m & 40m.

“Miracle Antenna” ATU.

Throw bag and cord.

Log:

Conclusions:

I start to wonder if the bigger heavy antennas I normally use are worth the extra effort when I get such good results with the simple antennas. Conditions weren’t great either. OK but not great.

What is clear is that this ultra-small configuration still works and will be what I take to the US in a weeks time.

73 ’til the next Summit!

DD5LP/P – April 20th 2019 – DL/BE-094 Irschenhausen – for the transatlantic S2S event.

Preparation:

April 20th. 2019 was to be the next Summit to Summit activity event between UK/EU and the Americas and the propagation conditions seemed to have slowly improved over the previous week.

My initial plan had been to activate Wank DL/EW-001 above Garmisch Partenkirchen but then the wife said she wanted to meet up with her school friend and two nieces, so an amended plan was needed. The group from Munich wanted to come out to the Easter Market on the banks of the local lake Ammersee and also take a sail with the paddle steamer on the lake. This wasn’t too bad as a 1-pointer summit that I hadn’t yet activated this year was only about 40 minutes drive away from the lake, Irschenhausen.

As Irschenhausen is a forested summit, there was no reason to try to use the VP2E antenna as verticals simply don’t work in forests, so I decided to take the lightweight set-up of the 6m LambdaHalbe mast and the SOTABeams linked dipole along with my screw-in-the-ground sun umbrella base.

As this was to be an afternoon activation with me arriving at the summit at 1400 local time (1200 UTC), the gear would be packed the morning of the activation.

What could go wrong?

The Activation:

With the Easter road traffic, we set off a little earlier than planned, but the traffic on the back roads was not any worse than normal, so I managed to drop off Gabriele, my wife, 30 minutes ahead of schedule – never mind, this gives me another 30 minutes activation time, or so I thought …

On arriving at the parking spot for Irschenhausen, while unloading the gear from the car, my phone rang and it was the wife. The ferry that I had planned for the groups afternoon cruise following the visit to the market, wasn’t running and so the afternoon would be shorter and could I come back earlier than planned. Oh well, that’s life!

The walk to the summit took about 12 minutes. Upon arrival I could see three new wind turbines that seem to tower over the summit, however they are actually a few kilometres away on the other side of the autobahn. At this distance, they don’t appear to cause any RF interference – at least not on HF. I was soon set up and calling CQ SOTA on 20m. It took a little while until I got my first reply which was a ground wave contact with Mario DJ2MX in Munich. A couple of other European activators were on 20m as well and so I tuned to their frequencies. The one that I could hear had a pile-up that I couldn’t break even as a Summit-to-Summit contact, so I went and found a different free frequency and spotted myself and started the CQ SOTA calls again. In the end during the 45 minutes that I was active, I managed six contacts including one european S2S with Stavros SV2RUJ.

I was aware that I had about a 40 minute drive back to where I had dropped my wife off, so at 1230 UTC, I called it a day and started to pack up, at which point I got a call from the wife to say the friends were leaving and could she be picked up please.

So at the end of the day, at least I did manage an activation. Irschenhausen is an easy summit to access and doesn’t rely on any cable cars, so it gives you flexibility on timing.

Photos:

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Equipment:

  • Xiegu X108G.
  • Battery box (2 x 5000maH hardcase LIPOs).
  • SOTABeams “Bandhopper” linked dipole.
  • Screw-in Sun Umbrella base.
  • 6 metre LambdaHalbe fibreglass portable mast.
  • Smartphone PocketRxTx App and USB cable with various connection leads.

Log:

Conclusions:

 The propagation was not as good as the previous day and EU-US contacts were only possible late afternoon and early evening. Of course I was there far too early for this opportunity.

73 ’til the next Summit!

DD5LP/P – April 6th 2019 – DL/AL-179 Weichberg – UK/EU – VK/JA/ZL S2S event.

Preparation:

Following the tests on the previous Thursday (report on this website) all equipment was already decided upon and loaded in the car Friday evening ready for an early start on Saturday.

The Activation:

The trip down to Weichberg was again uneventful. Although the weather forecast was for a warm morning with sunshine, I decided to stick with my winter jacket and I’m glad I did as on arrival at the parking spot the car thermometer showed -1°C and even after 4 hours, with the car parked in the sunshine, it had only risen to +4°C. And… it’s foggy again as it was on Thursday. No time to complain as no one knows exactly when the band will open (or not), so it’s grab all the gear from the back of the car and head up the track to the summit, while at least it’s not raining!

The set-up is exactly the same as on Thursday – the tripod, 10m mast and 40/20m VP2E with the X108G on the picnic bench. Actually based on what I saw on Thursday, I brought an additional item. A bright yellow plastic shopping bag which I clipped with a peg onto the antenna wire as it went over the main pathway on the summit. While putting the antenna up, I found the metal guy peg that I had lost on Thursday!

Based on actions over the last few weeks I thought it would be best to start on 40m, then watch the MUF and when it rose over 14MHz switch to 20m. Usually the maximum usable frequency (MUF) shoot up after dawn but of late that hasn’t been happening, so it’s a question whether the MUF gets over 14MHz before the long path window closes.

I started at 0540 UTC (0740 local) found a free frequency on what was already a busy 40m band, spotted myself and then started calling CQ, only to have EC4AHH start calling on top of me. I announced the frequency was in use and I’m sure he heard me but he just kept continuing to call CQ. This DQRM action, just because he has more power is a bad trait in some operators. I was hoping some QRO SOTA Chaser might come along and move EC4AHH away from the frequency but it wasn’t to be, so I had to find another frequency rather than waste more of my time with this situation. On the new frequency, I got five calls (four of those S2S), before I was DQRMed again, this time from a Russian speaking station. 40 metres in Europe is becoming a real rat race!

Luckily at this point I saw via my smart-phone that the 3000 km MUF was rising nicely, in the direction of 14MHz, so I lowered the mast, opened the links and then up went the antenna again, now resonant on 20m. Tuning around the band was quiet but not for long, soon there were more and more stations on the band including a VK net booming in at 5-9+ – I tried a call but breaking into a local net in Australia with just 20 watts and a wire antenna from the other side of the world is a lot to ask and indeed it proved impossible. I looked around for a free frequency then spotted myself and called CQ. The first call came from Marat RA9WJV/P on R9U/SO-235 in Asiatic Russia! Following Marat, Juergen DK3SJ on holiday in SV8 (Greece) called and after breaking the contact, the conditions peaked and on a second attempt the QSO was completed. After that 20m quietened down again and only semi-local contacts were possible. Checking on the Internet – the 3000 km MUF had dropped below 14MHz again.

At 0751 UTC (0951 local). I decided to call it a day and pack up and head home.

Here’s what happened to the MUF while I was on the summit and a little afterwards:

Looking at this had I stayed another 20-30 minutes, the MUF rose up over 14MHz again but by that time it is likely the long path window will have closed. So at the moment it looks like the time that contacts between Europe and Australasia are only 10 or perhaps 20 minutes long whereas those on 40m might be up to an hour-long. The problem for me is that for me to get via long path from southern Germany signals are weaker here than in northern Europe, possibly due to another “hop” for the signals being needed. Also chaser stations from Australia tend to have a beam on 20m but only a wire antenna on 40m. A comparison from this activation – a VK station on 40 metres was just copyable and probably not workable, whereas those on 20m were 5-9+.

A lesson learnt – for me to get a contact into VK with the current propagation conditions I need to concentrate on 20m and be on at just the right time. A difficult combination of requirements when operating from a summit.

Photos:

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Equipment:

  • Xiegu X108G.
  • Battery box (2 x 5000maH hardcase LIPOs).
  • Linked (20m/40m) VP2E (Vertically polarised, 2 element, 20m wire antenna).
  • Antenna warning marker (bright yellow plastic shopping bag).
  • Surveyors tripod.
  • 10 metre DX-Wire fibreglass portable mast.
  • Smartphone PocketRxTx App and USB cable with new EMI stopper board.

Log:

Conclusions:

This activation was not as successful as on Thursday with no contacts into VK. The extra stations on 40m didn’t help however even if there were less DQRMers on the band I think the signals would not have been strong enough to work in any case.

Equipment-wise I have a feeling that the 40m sections of the VP2E are resonant on the bottom of 40m but not at the top of the band, so some testing will be needed and most likely the 40m section of the antenna reduced in length, probably by wrapping the wire back on itself. This needs doing before my next activation using the antenna. Perhaps it can be done at the same time as measuring the directivity of the antenna?

73 ’til the next Summit!